Can Too Much Vitamin D Be Toxic





Mindblower, 22 May - 2015 ,

Can Too Much Vitamin D Be Toxic
Credit: youtube.com

As more people take vitamin D supplements, there has been concern that more people could experience toxic effects from very high vitamin D levels. But a new study shows that people rarely experience harmful side effects when taking large amounts of vitam

Can Too Much Vitamin D Be Toxic?

As more people  take vitamin D supplements, there has been concern that more people could experience toxic effects from very high vitamin D levels. But a new study shows that people rarely experience harmful side effects when taking large amounts of vitamin D.

Vitamin D toxicity, also called hypervitaminosis D, is a rare but potentially serious condition that occurs when you have excessive amounts of vitamin D in your body.

Vitamin D toxicity is usually caused by megadoses of vitamin D supplements — not by diet or sun exposure. That's because your body regulates the amount of vitamin D produced by sun exposure, and even fortified foods don't contain large amounts of vitamin D.

The main consequence of vitamin D toxicity is a buildup of calcium in your blood (hypercalcemia), which can cause poor appetite, nausea and vomiting. Weakness, frequent urination and kidney problems also may occur.

Too much of any good thing is a bad thing. Too much vitamin D can cause an abnormally high blood calcium level, which could result in nausea, constipation, confusion, abnormal heart rhythm, and even kidney stones.

It's nearly impossible to get too much vitamin D from sunlight or from foods (unless you take way too much cod liver oil). Nearly all vitamin D overdoses come from supplements.

The Institute of Medicine's Food and Nutrition Board's old 1997 recommendations suggested that 2,000 IU per day of vitamin D is safe for adults and that 1,000 IU per day is safe for infants up to 12 months of age. Many observers expected a drastic increase in the IOM's 2010 update.

Although vitamin D toxicity is uncommon even among people who take supplements, you may be at greater risk if you have health problems, such as liver or kidney conditions, or if you take thiazide-type diuretics. As always, talk to your doctor before taking vitamin and mineral supplements.

Source: webmd.com, mayoclinic.org, Livescience


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